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In a very short time curation has evolved from a minor supporting role to a major or even leading role in Social Media engagement.  It is no longer sufficient to just share items of interest, breaking news and opinion, not if you want to be regarded as authentic and taken seriously.

Information Filter

Knowledge Condenser

Curation has many definitions, including my own: “Curation is the acquisition, evaluation, augmentation, exhibition, disposition and maintenance of digital information, usually centered around a specific topic or theme”.  The Digital Curation Center (DCC) in the United Kingdom puts it more succinctly

Digital curation, broadly interpreted, is about maintaining and adding value to a trusted body of digital information for current and future use. (DCC)

Both definitions infer an information lifecyle process, that manages the digital objects from creation to deletion. Both suggest that capturing and adding value, whether by commentary or related material, is vital to the end product which is knowledge or information that can be referenced now and in the future.

Message Amplification

However the evolution of digital curation is experiencing some fragmentation.  Not that this is bad, but it does suggest the differences should be understood  as curation tools will differ in features and capabilities as each tries to satisfy its target customer base.  So far I have  identified 3 major distinctions in curation:

  1. Marketing Content: comes in several forms as marketeers move away from landing pages on Facebook and web sites, and seek to amplify brand presence through curated content.
  2. Information (or Knowledge Content): More focused on collecting and condensing information to support a topic or subject. Most commonly a reference site usually set up for either internal or external collaboration
  3. Personal Content – less dependent on content management features and capabilites: can either be used for amplification (self-branding) or condensing (information).

The question I would like to pose is who visits these curated sites and what are their preferences.  The following poll offers choices in the style and content of  curated sites.  Please let me know which sites you prefer to access for either information or shareable content.  I have made a further distinction for sites that are the result of either employee or community collaboration as they possibly differ from information sites in the degree of social participation (ie more social).

The cycle of network weaving activities – the larger the scale the more skilled the practitioner

June Holley, author of “The Network Weaver Handbook”,  was the guest on a recent #ideachat , hosted by @blogbrevity,  where she conducted  a spirited and vigorous discussion on the role of the network connector and collaborator whom she describes as a network weaver.  June believes that this is something we all do, often without realizing it.  The skills can be learned and improved, it’s all about how we are aware of and relate to each other. Ultimately we should be able to transform the world we live in.  To a large degree this is true especially in small to medium sized communities.  However scaling to the immensity of the Social Media Universe requires those skills to be refined, amplified and extended to the point where the role is highly specialized and potentially very much in demand.

The chart above is an attempt to summarize the collective input from the participants in #ideachat, none of whom contested the notion that network weaving was learn-able, necessary or trans-formative.  Indeed the flow of positive thinking provided a tsunami of skills and activities that were deemed necessary network weaver attributes.

Acquisition

The receptor phase of weaving represents the intake of content, context and resources.  This includes searches and information gathered from multiple sources in monitoring and participating in community conversations and chats.  Acquisition is equivalent to sourcing in a supply chain and represents the raw intelligence needed to fuel productivity.

Review

The review phase is the first stage of refining the raw intelligence.  Analysis is the primary activity and is applied to understanding the meaning, authenticity and importance of content and resource.

Curation

The second stage of refinement is curation, taking the analyzed information and making it transparent to the served communities and the world at large.  The refinement includes categorization (ie topics), classification, (eg value and relevancy) and commentary.

Association

The third stage of refinement is associating resources with communities, content or most importantly with each other, understanding how to apply the relevancy of information and resources to each other.  The third stage is also the mapping stage of the process, and is vital to the success of the network weaver.  As the weaver’s reach extends to national or even global scale other maps from trusted weavers can be incorporate into the weaver’s sphere of connectedness.

Construction

Construction is the implementation phase of network weaving.  It is establishing connections based on the refinement process, closing the triangle as June Holley describes it, between resources, communities and other network weavers.  Here the weaver is more than just a connector they are catalysts to action and innovation, whether directly contributing or standing back and monitoring the resulting activity.

Central to all these activities and processes is the governing principle of Cultivation.  This is the set of nurturing skills that separates the good network weavers from the great ones.  Cultivation is farming or husbandry in its highest form,  not just building connections but feeding them, nurturing them, strengthening them and understanding their needs.  It means being endlessly curious, constantly vigilant and forever questioning to ensure that the woven networks are as efficient and healthy as possible.

It is within nearly everyone’s reach to acquire, analyze and curate information on the social network; billions of Tweets, blogs, circles and walls are testimony to these skills being learned and practiced on a daily basis.  Everyone has the capability to imitate the African Weaver bird  and weave their own network of resource and content.  But it takes special skills to associate, construct and maintain vast networks of content and resource.  It takes a proficient weaver to connect each nest in the tree, and a master weaver to connect all trees within a region, all regions within a country and so on across the language and geographic divides that impede global connectivity.

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